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Plant Collections Network

Ornamental Grasses

The Pinus and ornamental grass collections at the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum became part of the Plant Collections Network (formerly North American Plant Collections Consortium, NAPCC) in January 2012. The Ornamental Grass Collection is unique in North America, and rivals others worldwide. While gardens include displays of individual grasses and there are several specialty nurseries, none are as extensive or well documented as the collection at the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum.  This collection began in 1987 as a research project under the management of Dr.

Heath & Heather

In 2010, Mendocino Coast Botanical Gardens’ Hardy Heath and Heather Collection was  recognized through the Plant Collections Network (formerly North American Plant Collections Consortium, NAPCC) as part of the National Collection. 

Paeonia

The peony collection at the Nichols Arboretum was awarded full-status accreditation in the Plant Collections Network (formerly North American Plant Collections Consortium, NAPCC) in February, 2013. Expansion of this project among American Public Gardens Association member gardens was slated to occur during 2015. 

Nymphaea

Longwood Gardens celebrates a long history of growing, hybridizing and displaying waterlilies going back to 1956. Its Nymphaea collection currently includes 97 taxa and became part of the Plant Collections Network (formerly North American Plant Collections Consortium) in October 2012. The majority of the collection consists of hybrids with a high number of tropical day and night-blooming varieties, in addition to hardy taxa and several species historically significant or frequently used by hybridizers.

Primula

The Jensen-Olson Arboretum in Juneau Alaska has recently been granted National Collections status for the genus Primula by the Plant Collections Network (formerly North American Plant Collections Consortium, NAPCC).   This is quite an honor for a garden that only opened as a public institution in 2007.

Rhododendron

The Wister Rhododendron Garden is one of the largest collections of hardy elepidote rhododendrons in North America. Initiated in 1953, the collection represents the culmination of a life's work by one of the leading Rhododendron breeders in the United States, Dr. John Casper Wister.

Cercis

The JC Raulston Arboretum has been growing Cercis since 1978, building a significant Collection of broad taxonomic diversity. The mild temperate climate where the arboretum is located in North Carolina allows all presently described species and cultivars in the genus to be grown. The Arboretum's recently completed master plan designates a prominent location for the Cercis Collection, as well as additional sites for featuring individual specimens in Plantman's Woods and Asian Valley.

Penstemon - Western US

Idaho Botanical Garden was recently awarded provisional status for our Penstemon collection by the Plant Collections Network (formerly North American Plant Collections Consortium, NAPCC).  In North America, recognition by Plant Collections Network confers national status for public garden plant collections.  It is a joint program of the American Public Gardens Association and the U.S.

Camellia

In 1997, the Norfolk Botanical Garden's camellia collection was named a Plant Collections Network (formerly North American Plant Collections Consortium, NAPCC) collection. It is only two Plant Collections Network collections focusing on camellias. Norfolk Botanical Garden has more than 1700 camellia plants. Approximately 750 of those plants are found in the Hofheimer Camellia Garden, established in 1992 as a joint project of the Norfolk Botanical Garden and the Virginia Camellia Society. It is named in memory of Alan J. and Aline F.

Kalmia

Highstead’s Kalmia Collection is a one-acre concentrated display of more than 70 Kalmia forms and cultivars of 3 species set within a native stand of Kalmia latifolia that spreads across more than 55 acres of oak forest. This setting presents opportunities to view (1) how laurel species adjust and survive naturally within different habitats, (2) the immense range of cultivars that have been produced by horticulturists and can be cultivated in the home landscape, and (3) a restored woodland site with a naturalistic planting style.

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