Visitor Experience

Change

Wednesday, May 22, 2013 (1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m)
 
A New Dawn Rising at Ohio State’s university’s Secrest Arboretum
 
Mighty oaks from little acorns grow, and the same can be said that “from fallen oaks great forests 
spring.”  Natural disasters come to all, and the proof of the sustainability of a public garden is often what comes next.  In 1908 Edmund Secrest looked out over barren fields: trees were planted and forests grew. Then tragedy struck.  In 2010, a tornado stormed through the arboretum downing more than fifteen hundred large trees. The loss of the research value of these plants, their landscape value of over one and-a-half million dollars, and the environmental services they provided was devastating. What came next – replanting of over two thousand trees within two years of the tornado, donations of cash, trees, landscaping, and arboricultural services, development of new research plots, and the spur to better germplasm protection – is a tale to interest all public gardens. it has also resulted in an interesting story of insurance implications, and increased awareness of the science of tornado studies and the biology of natural disturbances.  Participants will learn how they can activate support from their various publics following a natural disaster, develop research and renewal projects that could only happen after such an event, and the meanings that the green industry, visitors, donors, and others drew from 
the disaster.
 
Presenters: James Chatfield, Associate Professor and Extension Specialist, Ohio State University; Kenneth Cochran, Director, Secrest Arboretum at Ohio State University; Mary Maloney, Director, Chadwick Arboretum at Ohio State University.
 
 
Wednesday, May 22, 2013 (2:45 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.)
 
Exceeding Guests’ Safety Expectations and How it Impacts Your bottom line
 
How many complaints and lawsuits could be avoided if the injured person felt cared for and important to the institution vs. being brushed aside in the hopes that they would “just go away?” Additionally, how much money could be saved in insurance premium/litigation costs that could instead be used to improve programs and attract members?  Gardens are a place for reflection, peace, and tranquility.  Most people take for granted that they will be safe while visiting your institution.  Slips, trips, and falls cause the majority of injuries sustained while visiting public gardens and it is your preparation, response, and follow-up that could mean the difference between turning an injured guest into a new member or being 
named as the defendant in a lawsuit.  With the proper preparation, training, response and follow-up, it is possible to turn a negative experience into a positive or a complainant into a new member. At the same time, you can prevent an increase in your insurance premium and avoid negative publicity.
 
Presenters: Sharon Van Loon, CPCU, LIC, Berends Hendricks Stuit Insurance; Greg Papiernik, Public Safety and Security Manager, Longwood Gardens; Harriet Resnick, Vice President, Visitor Operations, Chicago Botanic Gardens; Lisa Glass, Public Safety Officer, Longwood Gardens.
 
 
 
 
 
 
Thursday, May 23, 2013 (8:15 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.)
 
Visitor Experience/ Marketing:
 
Public Gardens and Tourism:  a Match for Success
 
As the baby boomers move out of their gardens and have the time and resources to travel, there is no doubt that the latest TaMS (Tourism activity Motivation Survey) numbers on tourists’garden visits will be growing.   In order to capture this opportunity, garden leadership needs to understand what is happening and how to capitalize.   How can your garden attract these tourists? how can you capture some of their dollars to support your institution? Come and get some facts and success stories.  The most recent TaMS points to an important potential market.   TaMS informs us that 10.5% (23,307,038) of adult Americans visited garden theme attractions while on an out-of-town, overnight trip of one or more nights. In Canada, 13.1% (3,246,208) did the same.  More adult Americans visited botanical gardens (9.1%) than visited garden theme parks (3.2%) while on these trips. of those who visited garden theme attractions, 20.6% (4,804,719) reported that doing so was the main reason for taking at least one trip in the past two years.
 
Presenters: Michel Gautier, Chair, Ontario Garden Tourism Coalition; Richard W. Benfield, Professor of Geography, Central Connecticut State University; Alexander Reford, Director, Reford Gardens, and Dave Cowen, General Manager, Butchart Gardens.
 
 
Thursday, May 23, 2013 (10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.)
 
The Way to Your Visitor’s Heart is Through the Stomach
 
Spicy chiles.  Rich chocolate. Roasted vegetables perfectly paired with fine local wines.  A chef demonstrating tested recipes.  A dynamic local farmer describing the bounty of the harvest.  Hungry 
for more? The local food movement is gaining traction throughout the country, and this session will give you proven strategies to attract new visitors, add flavor and flair to their experience at your garden, and enrich their connection to plants through food. These three seasoned kitchen-garden and culinary-focused program experts will share the “secret sauces” with which they dress their food-focused programs.  Learn best practices of braiding together food and plant education. Discover how you can blend ingredients already offered by your own public garden—of any size—fold in enthusiastic local producers 
and partners, and serve-up outstanding wait-listed programs during which your visitors will learn about plants and connect with their community. We’ll even throw in our favorite program-tested recipes!
 
Presenters: Susan Thurston-Hamerski, Director of Adult Education, Minnesota Landscape Arboretum of the University of Minnesota; Sabina Carr, Director of Marketing, Communications & Visitor Experience, Atlanta Botanical Gard.
 
 
Friday, May 24, 2013 (10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.)
 
Visitor Experience Mini Series
 
Introducing the Public to Evolving Landscapes
 
Building projects are often an institution’s most expensive and permanent statements about their 
values and vision.  How can institutions capitalize on the constituent excitement surrounding such an opening? While many public gardens are introducing new buildings and gardens to their aging infrastructures, the roll-out of a new structure presents a range of issues and problems, as well as opportunities, for engendering loyalty and interest in the public mind.  In this discussion, we will look at three examples of institutions that seized the opportunity of introducing a new building in order to tell a story about the values of a garden in the hardscape world – in press, marketing, public programming, interpretation – to visitors and the broader community.
 
Presenters: Kathryn Glass, Vice President of Marketing and Public Engagement, Brooklyn Botanic Garden; Kate Blumm, Manager of Communications, Brooklyn Botanic Garden; Liz Fetchin, Director of Marketing and Communications, Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens; Harriet Resnick, Vice President of Visitor Programs and Operations.
 
 
Growing Curiosity to Enhance Science Literacy
 
Science matters!  Learn about low-budget, low-commitment activities and interactive apps developed to compel visitors to learn more.  Gardens must advance science literacy to remain relevant. We are challenged with making plant science and biological diversity compelling. in this session, participants will learn to nurture curiosity and create casual learning opportunities, identify interesting stories within their collection, experiment beyond their usual operational framework, narrow their focus to find biological stories with broader implications, leverage experts and the academic science community, and leverage technology to engage visitors.  Presenters will share examples from the Arnold Arboretum about a variety of activities that encourage and support science literacy, including the introduction of  Tree Mobs, interpreter Stations and Family backpacks. This session will also demonstrate how mobile 
Technology is leveraged to provide access to more information about our plants and incorporate arts and 
culture with biological science.
 
Presenters: Pamela Thompson, Manager of Adult Education, Arnold Arboretum of 
Harvard University; Julie Warsowe, Manager of Visitor Education, Arnold Arboretum 
of Harvard University
 
 
Friday, May 24, 2013 (1:45 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.)
 
From Groundskeepers to Greeters:  Creating a Culture of Guest Services
 
All gardens hope that their guests receive a great experience from their employees, but very few have a dedicated program to teach their staff these expectations.learn the 4 great Steps of Service of retail and the service industry training. This session will teach you how to establish a similar training program at your 
Garden. a sample training session from the series will also be presented during this exciting, fun-filled 
and educational hour!
 
Presenter: Chuck Ross, Guest Experience Manager and Guest Services Team Rep. TBD, Longwood Gardens

Wednesday, May 22, 2013 (1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m) Location: Arizona VIII

A New Dawn Rising at Ohio State’s university’s Secrest Arboretum

Mighty oaks from little acorns grow, and the same can be said that “from fallen oaks great forests 
spring.”  Natural disasters come to all, and the proof of the sustainability of a public garden is often what comes next.  In 1908 Edmund Secrest looked out over barren fields: trees were planted and forests grew. Then tragedy struck.  In 2010, a tornado stormed through the arboretum downing more than fifteen hundred large trees. The loss of the research value of these plants, their landscape value of over one and-a-half million dollars, and the environmental services they provided was devastating. What came next – replanting of over two thousand trees within two years of the tornado, donations of cash, trees, landscaping, and arboricultural services, development of new research plots, and the spur to better germplasm protection – is a tale to interest all public gardens. it has also resulted in an interesting story of insurance implications, and increased awareness of the science of tornado studies and the biology of natural disturbances.  Participants will learn how they can activate support from their various publics following a natural disaster, develop research and renewal projects that could only happen after such an event, and the meanings that the green industry, visitors, donors, and others drew from 
the disaster.
 
Presenters: James Chatfield, Associate Professor and Extension Specialist, Ohio State University; Kenneth Cochran, Director, Secrest Arboretum at Ohio State University; Mary Maloney, Director, Chadwick Arboretum at Ohio State University.
 

 

Wednesday, May 22, 2013 (2:45 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.) Location: Arizona VIII

Exceeding Guests’ Safety Expectations and How it Impacts Your bottom line

How many complaints and lawsuits could be avoided if the injured person felt cared for and important to the institution vs. being brushed aside in the hopes that they would “just go away?” Additionally, how much money could be saved in insurance premium/litigation costs that could instead be used to improve programs and attract members?  Gardens are a place for reflection, peace, and tranquility.  Most people take for granted that they will be safe while visiting your institution.  Slips, trips, and falls cause the majority of injuries sustained while visiting public gardens and it is your preparation, response, and follow-up that could mean the difference between turning an injured guest into a new member or being named as the defendant in a lawsuit.  With the proper preparation, training, response and follow-up, it is possible to turn a negative experience into a positive or a complainant into a new member. At the same time, you can prevent an increase in your insurance premium and avoid negative publicity.
 
Presenters: Sharon Van Loon, CPCU, LIC, Berends Hendricks Stuit Insurance; Greg Papiernik, Public Safety and Security Manager, Longwood Gardens; Harriet Resnick, Vice President, Visitor Operations, Chicago Botanic Gardens; Lisa Glass, Public Safety Officer, Longwood Gardens.
 

 

Thursday, May 23, 2013 (8:15 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.) Location: Vaquero F

Visitor Experience/ Marketing:

Public Gardens and Tourism:  a Match for Success

As the baby boomers move out of their gardens and have the time and resources to travel, there is no doubt that the latest TaMS (Tourism activity Motivation Survey) numbers on tourists’garden visits will be growing.   In order to capture this opportunity, garden leadership needs to understand what is happening and how to capitalize.   How can your garden attract these tourists? how can you capture some of their dollars to support your institution? Come and get some facts and success stories.  The most recent TaMS points to an important potential market.   TaMS informs us that 10.5% (23,307,038) of adult Americans visited garden theme attractions while on an out-of-town, overnight trip of one or more nights. In Canada, 13.1% (3,246,208) did the same.  More adult Americans visited botanical gardens (9.1%) than visited garden theme parks (3.2%) while on these trips. of those who visited garden theme attractions, 20.6% (4,804,719) reported that doing so was the main reason for taking at least one trip in the past two years.
 
Presenters: Michel Gautier, Chair, Ontario Garden Tourism Coalition; Richard W. Benfield, Professor of Geography, Central Connecticut State University; Alexander Reford, Director, Reford Gardens, and Dave Cowen, General Manager, Butchart Gardens.
 

 

Thursday, May 23, 2013 (10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.) Location: Vaquero F

The Way to Your Visitor’s Heart is Through the Stomach

Spicy chiles.  Rich chocolate. Roasted vegetables perfectly paired with fine local wines.  A chef demonstrating tested recipes.  A dynamic local farmer describing the bounty of the harvest.  Hungry 
for more? The local food movement is gaining traction throughout the country, and this session will give you proven strategies to attract new visitors, add flavor and flair to their experience at your garden, and enrich their connection to plants through food. These three seasoned kitchen-garden and culinary-focused program experts will share the “secret sauces” with which they dress their food-focused programs.  Learn best practices of braiding together food and plant education. Discover how you can blend ingredients already offered by your own public garden—of any size—fold in enthusiastic local producers 
and partners, and serve-up outstanding wait-listed programs during which your visitors will learn about plants and connect with their community. We’ll even throw in our favorite program-tested recipes!
 
Presenters: Susan Thurston-Hamerski, Director of Adult Education, Minnesota Landscape Arboretum of the University of Minnesota; Sabina Carr, Director of Marketing, Communications & Visitor Experience, Atlanta Botanical Garden.
 


Friday, May 24, 2013 (10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.) Location: Vaquero F

Visitor Experience Mini Series

Introducing the Public to Evolving Landscapes

Building projects are often an institution’s most expensive and permanent statements about their 
values and vision.  How can institutions capitalize on the constituent excitement surrounding such an opening? While many public gardens are introducing new buildings and gardens to their aging infrastructures, the roll-out of a new structure presents a range of issues and problems, as well as opportunities, for engendering loyalty and interest in the public mind.  In this discussion, we will look at three examples of institutions that seized the opportunity of introducing a new building in order to tell a story about the values of a garden in the hardscape world – in press, marketing, public programming, interpretation – to visitors and the broader community.
 
Presenters: Kathryn Glass, Vice President of Marketing and Public Engagement, Brooklyn Botanic Garden; Kate Blumm, Manager of Communications, Brooklyn Botanic Garden; Liz Fetchin, Director of Marketing and Communications, Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens; Harriet Resnick, Vice President of Visitor Programs and Operations.

PRESENTATION NOT AVAILABLE.
 

Growing Curiosity to Enhance Science Literacy

Science matters!  Learn about low-budget, low-commitment activities and interactive apps developed to compel visitors to learn more.  Gardens must advance science literacy to remain relevant. We are challenged with making plant science and biological diversity compelling. in this session, participants will learn to nurture curiosity and create casual learning opportunities, identify interesting stories within their collection, experiment beyond their usual operational framework, narrow their focus to find biological stories with broader implications, leverage experts and the academic science community, and leverage technology to engage visitors.  Presenters will share examples from the Arnold Arboretum about a variety of activities that encourage and support science literacy, including the introduction of  Tree Mobs, interpreter Stations and Family backpacks. This session will also demonstrate how mobile Technology is leveraged to provide access to more information about our plants and incorporate arts and culture with biological science.
 
Presenters: Pamela Thompson, Manager of Adult Education, Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University; Julie Warsowe, Manager of Visitor Education, Arnold Arboretum 
of Harvard University
 
CLICK HERE to view the presentation

 

Friday, May 24, 2013 (1:45 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.) Location: Vaquero F

From Groundskeepers to Greeters:  Creating a Culture of Guest Services

All gardens hope that their guests receive a great experience from their employees, but very few have a dedicated program to teach their staff these expectations.learn the 4 great Steps of Service of retail and the service industry training. This session will teach you how to establish a similar training program at your 
Garden. a sample training session from the series will also be presented during this exciting, fun-filled 
and educational hour!
 
Presenter: Chuck Ross, Guest Experience Manager and Guest Services Team Rep. TBD, Longwood Gardens.